HuManilans is about the people of Manila – and everywhere else.

These are pieces of visual narratives that I hope would stir bystanders to action to help the disadvantaged – the scores of nameless, faceless individuals — whom I portrayed in these paintings in non-traditional ways: spontaneous but bold brushstrokes, splatters of paint, scratches and smears rendered on my canvases of pizza boxes, carton boxes of beverages, take-out brown paper bags, and shopping bags.

My goal in producing this series of artworks is to move my viewers to do even the smallest of deed to ease the burden of every man, woman and child – not only Manilans – and recognize the human beings that they are. – BoyLuna

I’m Fine (19.5” x 25.5”, Acrylic on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

Mixing white, cyans and grays around the main figures in this piece and the intersecting and overlapping jagged and broken lines and shapes show the anxiety and controlled emotion of the young lovers. Small drops and splatters of paint on the ripped and scratched carton box augment the dramatic action of this work’s design elements.
Mixing white, cyans and grays around the main figures in this piece and the intersecting and overlapping jagged and broken lines and shapes show the anxiety and controlled emotion of the young lovers. Small drops and splatters of paint on the ripped and scratched carton box augment the dramatic action of this work’s design elements.

 

Doctors Without Borders (14” x 21”, Acrylic on Paper Bag, 2015, Philippines)

I have always admired the passion, dedication and commitment of Médecins Sans Frontières or Doctors Without Borders, best known for its projects in war-torn regions and developing countries facing endemic diseases. The devastation caused by Typhoon Yolanda in the Visayan region back in 2013 drove me to create an artwork that would celebrate the works of volunteers, who risk life and limb to help victims of catastrophes. Consider this my humble way of expressing my admiration and respect for their works and sacrifices.
I have always admired the passion, dedication and commitment of Médecins Sans Frontières or Doctors Without Borders, best known for its projects in war-torn regions and developing countries facing endemic diseases. The devastation caused by Typhoon Yolanda in the Visayan region back in 2013 drove me to create an artwork that would celebrate the works of volunteers, who risk life and limb to help victims of catastrophes. Consider this my humble way of expressing my admiration and respect for their works and sacrifices.

 

Doubles Partner (25.5” x 15.5”, Acrylic on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

When faced with a blank canvas, I try to ignite my creative impulse by walking around where people congregate. I quietly sit in a corner, and observe and draw people preoccupied with what they are doing. I will then re-draw the selected pose and transfer it to another setting, such as this. This couple is ready to play tennis but is distracted by a friend’s online post. Ripped and torn areas, and drips and stains scattered on the surface convey the protagonists’ priorities.
When faced with a blank canvas, I try to ignite my creative impulse by walking around where people congregate. I quietly sit in a corner, and observe and draw people preoccupied with what they are doing. I will then re-draw the selected pose and transfer it to another setting, such as this. This couple is ready to play tennis but is distracted by a friend’s online post. Ripped and torn areas, and drips and stains scattered on the surface convey the protagonists’ priorities.

 

Mga Bagong Anak ni Bonifacio (BGC Kids) (23.5” x 24”, Mixed-Media on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

This painting, part of a series that focuses on my exploration of everyday life in the city, was inspired by Pop Artist George Segal’s sculpture, Street Crossing. Affluent urban kids are on their way to spend the day at the mall. Rendered in bold and vibrant warm colors that contrast with shades and tints of cool hues, the figures stand out amid bits and pieces of cut-out texts and photos that complement the hip lifestyle of today’s urban youth.
This painting, part of a series that focuses on my exploration of everyday life in the city, was inspired by Pop Artist George Segal’s sculpture, Street Crossing. Affluent urban kids are on their way to spend the day at the mall. Rendered in bold and vibrant warm colors that contrast with shades and tints of cool hues, the figures stand out amid bits and pieces of cut-out texts and photos that complement the hip lifestyle of today’s urban youth.

 


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Beat the Hot May Weather! (9.5” x 23”, Acrylic on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

In this painting, I toned the background with process cyan. An imaginary line at the center served as my guide for the main figures of the composition. The bold and broad brushstrokes I used heighten the intensity of the match. Drips and splatters represent the pain and struggles of both fighters. The tight cropping of the image invites the viewers to take a closer look and study the other details of the piece.
In this painting, I toned the background with process cyan. An imaginary line at the center served as my guide for the main figures of the composition. The bold and broad brushstrokes I used heighten the intensity of the match. Drips and splatters represent the pain and struggles of both fighters. The tight cropping of the image invites the viewers to take a closer look and study the other details of the piece.

 

Bitter Coffee (23.5” x 24”, Acrylic on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

This is a telling comment on the plight of coffee plantation workers. Women -- young and old alike -- are on their way to the processing factory after the day’s harvest. To dramatize their bitter lives, I borrowed the painting style of Italian Post-Impressionist Amedeo Modigliani, which I applied on the workers’ upper torso and arms. Company symbols of popular coffee producers and suppliers and religious verses are scattered around the focal area to serve as clues as to what this piece is trying to communicate.
This is a telling comment on the plight of coffee plantation workers. Women — young and old alike — are on their way to the processing factory after the day’s harvest. To dramatize their bitter lives, I borrowed the painting style of Italian Post-Impressionist Amedeo Modigliani, which I applied on the workers’ upper torso and arms. Company symbols of popular coffee producers and suppliers and religious verses are scattered around the focal area to serve as clues as to what this piece is trying to communicate.

 

Blind Audition (19” x 25.5”, Acrylic on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

Musicians have been the favorite theme of great artists from Picasso’ Three Musicians, Degas’ The Violinist and Peter Blake’s cover of Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album. Inspired and driven by these influences, I tried to emulate the works of the masters. With a ukelele on a bench and a shoebox, a visually impaired musician serenades passers-by with his untrained voice to get by each day. The use of dominant cool colors and the unplanned rendition of the brushstrokes were meant to create an illusion of irregular movement and action, and to evoke sympathy.
Musicians have been the favorite theme of great artists from Picasso’ Three Musicians, Degas’ The Violinist and Peter Blake’s cover of Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album. Inspired and driven by these influences, I tried to emulate the works of the masters.
With a ukelele on a bench and a shoebox, a visually impaired musician serenades passers-by with his untrained voice to get by each day. The use of dominant cool colors and the unplanned rendition of the brushstrokes were meant to create an illusion of irregular movement and action, and to evoke sympathy.

 

Flower Girls (23.5” x 29.5”, Mixed-Media on Carton Box, 2015, Philippines)

Sampaguita vendors are a common sight in front of Catholic churches whenever there is a Mass going on. Most of them are minors who sell the garlands to help ease their families’ hand-to-mouth existence. This couple plies their wares to parishioners attending a late evening Mass. Intersecting lines and shapes, drips and blotches of ink and amber, burnt sienna and ochre paints on torn and folded cardboard all convey static and subdued energy.
Sampaguita vendors are a common sight in front of Catholic churches whenever there is a Mass going on. Most of them are minors who sell the garlands to help ease their families’ hand-to-mouth existence. This couple plies their wares to parishioners attending a late evening Mass. Intersecting lines and shapes, drips and blotches of ink and amber, burnt sienna and ochre paints on torn and folded cardboard all convey static and subdued energy.

 

The Artist

12047522_1005537806175865_1079876112_nBoyLuna is a Filipino painter residing in Metro Manila, Philippines. He began his career as a Graphic Designer but opportunities steered him to take the path of education and now, painting. His works embrace a variety of styles, among them Cubism, Impressionism, Expressionism and Pop Art. Expressionism is the style he has been most comfortable with when communicating images of visual narratives.

He began engaging in studio art in the mid-1990s, producing massive paintings for school and theatre productions. His works are the result of his exploration of human conditions, both the festive and the joyless, in the city where he resides, as well as urban areas he has visited.

His art exhibits include KapARTiran Fair (Quezon City, 2013), JakARTa Works (2012), JakARTa Teachers (2012), ARTtitude (Jakarta 2010), Masterpieces Art Auctions (Jakarta 2009) and Sense of Arts (Jakarta 2008, 2009).

If you are interested in his art, contact him at atelierluna12@gmail.com.

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